Skip to main content
Frequently Asked Questions 
  1. How does the tanning process work?
  2. Why should I tan?
  3. Why tan indoors?
  4. I just started tanning, how long will it take to see results?
  5. How often is a person allowed to tan?
  6. Why can't I tan as long as I want?
  7. Why does a tan disappear?
  8. Why do some people get white spots/stripes after tanning?
  9. Why do some people get a rash or itch after tanning?
  10. What is that "burnt skin" smell from tanning? What causes it?
  11. Why use indoor tanning lotions?
  12. Can I use an outside tanning lotion, oil, or baby oil?
  13. Should I use any type of moisturizer for my dry skin?
  14. What is Indoor Tanning Lotion Diversion?
  15. Why is "Diversion" bad.
  16. Is there a "Best indoor tanning lotion"?
  17. What is an Accelerator lotion?
  18. What is a Bronzer lotion?
  19. What is a Mixture lotion?
  20. What is a Tingle lotion?
  21. What is a Fluff lotion?
  22. What is a Blush lotion?
  23. How does Spray Tanning work? What is in Spray Tanning Solution?
  24. A 20 minute session in a tanning bed is equivalent to how many hours in the natural sun?
  25. Can the UV rays emitted by indoor tanning lamps pass through the skin and affect internal organs?
  26. Is it harmful to wear contact lenses when tanning indoors?
  27. Why do some dermatologists warn people against sun exposure?
  28. Why do some dermatologists or medical physicians automatically blame tanning institutions for bacterial or fungus skin disorders?
  29. Can indoor tanning cure acne?
  30. Can indoor tanning equipment be used to treat Psoriasis?
  31. Does tanning help treat Depression or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)?
  32. Can I get MRSA (staph infection) from a tanning bed?
  33. Can I get Dermatophytosis or (ringworm) from a tanning bed?
  34. Can I get Scabies (sarcoptes scabiei) from a tanning bed?
  35. Is it possible to contract aids and other sexually transmitted diseases from indoor tanning equipment?
  36. Does tanning cause melanoma, a fatal form of skin cancer?
  37. May pregnant women tan indoors?
  38. Can medications affect my tan?
  39. Which medications are most likely to cause photosensitivity?
  40. Why does Maui Beach always verify I am using protective eyewear?
  41. What would happen if I didn't use eyewear?
  42. How do I prevent "raccoon eyes?"
  43. Should I shower before my tanning session?
  44. Should I shower after a tanning session?
  45. My face and legs are real hard to get tan. What should I do about that?
  46. I keep tanning but I just can't seem to get any darker. What can I do?
  47. I can't get tan outdoors, will tanning in a tanning bed help?
  48. I'm over 40, and I don't seem to tan as good as I used to. Why is that?
  49. What are some precautions with tanning?
  50. I heard Tanning Beds have been reclassified by the FDA, what does that mean for me?
  51. My friend says that a sunburn will fade into a tan.
  52. If a tan and a sunburn are different, just what is a sunburn?
  53. Should people tan who have skin cancer in the past?
  54. How does Maui Beach ensure the quality of their bed cleaning/sanitizing process?
  55. What can I expect from red light therapy treatments?
  56. Are red light treatments safe? What does the FDA say?
  57. How does Rejuvenessence red light therapy work?
  58. Does red light therapy produce the same light as from the sun?
  59. How does red light therapy differ from laser treatments?
  60. How soon will red light therapy results become noticeable?
  61. Does Rejuvenessence red light therapy lamps treat acne, age spots, and weathered skin?
  62. Does red light treat cellulite?
  63. Does red light therapy work equally well on all skin types?
  64. How long will red light therapy results last?
  65. Will red light therapy treatments hurt?
  66. Can red light therapy hurt my eyes?
  1. How does the tanning process work?
    There are three components that make the tanning process work UVA, UVB, and Oxygen. UVB starts the tanning process by stimulating the tanning cells (melanocytes) to produce melanosomes, which contain melanin (pigment). UVA darkens the melanin that has been produced, but before that can happen, melanin needs a certain amount of oxygen to facilitate UVA. The third component, oxygen, comes from blood vessels beneath the skin and various elements outside the skin. The tanning process can be optimized (with oxygen supplementation) through the use of professional indoor tanning lotions, moisturizers, and supplements.   back to top


  2. Why should I tan?
    Sunlight is absolutely essential to all life on earth. There are various reasons, both biological and psychological. Controlled exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) may minimize some health risks that simply can't be controlled when sunbathing outdoors. There are many documented medical studies that support the idea that moderate exposure to UV light can be therapeutic for the body, its organs, and the mind. According to Zane R. Kime, M.D. in his book "Sunlight", the following effects may be derived from exposure to ultraviolet light: Decreased blood pressure, Increased muscular strength, Lower resting heart rate, Increased resistance to stress, Increased cardiac output, Increased adrenaline in tissue, Lower blood cholesterol, Increased sex hormones. Ultraviolet light can reduce the appearance of scars by blending shades and darkening of the actual scar. It also helps to clear up acne by drying up oil on the skin. Acne isn't the only skin condition improved by ultraviolet light. It also cures Psoriasis, Eczema, and Jaundice. Ultraviolet light can even help you lose weight! Ultraviolet light stimulates the thyroid gland, which boosts your metabolism. Increase in metabolism means added weight lose. We further know that UV light is our primary source of Vitamin D, which assists in the absorption of calcium. This in turn helps form and maintains bone structure, essentially building stronger bones and eventually aids in the prevention of osteoporosis. Vitamin D is believed to reduce the risk of diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, cancers, including colon cancer, and breast cancer. It is widely known that these diseases are more prominent among people who live in climates that have less natural sunlight than those who live in a sunny environment. Vitamin D is essential for proper health and while other sources such as supplements are available, the main source of vitamin D for most people is UV. In addition, people, generally, look and feel better with a tan. Thus, having a tan and confidence with one's outward appearance can provide a psychological uplift.  back to top


  3. Why tan indoors?
    When you tan in an indoor tanning salon, your skin produces a tan in the same way that it does when you tan outdoors - through the absorption of ultraviolet light. One of the many benefits of indoor tanning is that it allows you to control the amount of ultraviolet light that your exposed to, to help avoid a sunburn. At Maui Beach your tanning session is determined by the equipment manufacturers recommendation as well as our trained staff that take into account your tanning history and individual skin type. Convenience is another consideration when choosing to tan indoors. Outdoor tanning is often limited by seasons, location, and weather. Indoor tanning offers you convenience, control, and dependable results.  back to top


  4. I just started tanning, how long will it take to see results?
    Depending on your natural tanning ability, typically skin tones change within the first few tanning sessions. Depending on your skin type, you should have a good base tan in 2-8 tanning sessions. Once your desired color is achieved, maintain your tan, by tanning 1-3 sessions a week.  back to top


  5. How often is a person allowed to tan?
    Since 1986, the Food and Drug Administration guidelines suggest that 24 hours should pass between tanning sessions. Pigmentation and/or erythema (sunburn) may not be fully visible for between 12-24 hours. Thus two tanning sessions within this 24 hour period could cause an unintentional burn. In general, maximum pigmentation is optimized, following a proper exposure schedule, typically within 2-8 tanning sessions.  back to top


  6. Why can't I tan as long as I want?
    It is the responsibility of Maui Beach to eliminate the opportunity for customers to sunburn while visiting one of our tanning salons. The promotion of moderate, sensible, and responsible exposure to ultraviolet light is the goal of any professional tanning salon.  back to top


  7. Why does a tan disappear?
    The "tan", or pigmentation process, occurs in the epidermis, the top skin layer. The epidermis replaces all its skin cells every 28-30 days. Cells in the inner portion of the top skin layer divide themselves, migrate to the surface, gradually die and slough off. Skin cells contain melanin, and as a result of UV exposure, rise to the surface and flake off. Therefore, a tan can be maintained only by repeated exposure to UV light.  back to top


  8. Why do some people get white spots/stripes after tanning?
    There are several reasons why white spots or white stripes become noticeable, on the body, once the tanning process begins. In the event you are tanning in a "bed", white spots/stripes can be a result of a lack of oxygen to your pressure points, that come in contact with the tanning bed acrylic (those who sleep in tanning beds often get these white areas). There is a simple way to minimize and eliminate this condition- take your right forearm and the bottom of their right foot and push up gently for a few seconds. This will relieve pressure on the right hand side of their body, allowing their skin to breathe for a few moments, then repeat with their left side. Remember it is best to alternate your positions when tanning. Patches of skin which do not tan could be the result of genetic determination. The melanocytes in that certain area may simply not be efficient at producing melanin. One common reason is vitiligo, which is characterized by irregularly shaped white patches of skin, surrounded by dark borders. The white patches are sensitive to UV exposure. Doctors will often use a lotion based form of psoralen (an extremely photosensitizing agent) and induce up to second-degree burns on the specific areas. This in effect, reactivates dormant melanocyte cells into producing melanin again. In time the white areas will gradually begin to match the surrounding areas. Another cause for white spots is a skin fungus known as tinea versicolor. This fungus actually begins in the hair and falls down primarily onto the upper body like dandruff. The affected areas prevent the skin from tanning and as a result create white spots. Sometimes the spots can be a little scaly. The fungus in tinea versicolor produces an acid that inhibits the production of tyrosinase in your skin's melanocytes, which in turn prevents the production of melanin in the affected areas. While the fungus is harmless, it does absorb UV light which would normally penetrate the skin. This fungus did not appear as a result of tanning; it merely becomes noticeable once tanning occurs. It can be remedied through the use of prescription drugs or some other topical lotions. There are prescription medications available. Other inexpensive options are, Body Drench who makes a product called "Wipe Out" and Body Invest has a product called "Halt". Treating tinea versicolor is fairly easy, but recovery may take up to several months. In summary, white spots/stripes can be caused by a medication you may be taking, a genetic disposition to tanning unevenly, a lack of pigment in that area, scar tissue from acne, psoriasis, a fungus, or pressure points (resulting in oxygen deprivation in those immediate areas - see question # 1).   back to top


  9. Why do some people get a rash or itch after tanning?
    A number of skin irritations may accompany indoor tanning at one time or another. Among these are rashes, itches, dry skin or white spots. An itch may occur from a reduced rate of melanin production in a particular area of the body, usually the stomach, chest, or other areas that have had minimal exposure to sunlight or tanning for a prolonged period. This may occur between the 3rd and 5th tanning session for most people, normally temporary, and more of a nuisance than a real problem. This is usually a result of over stimulation of the nerve endings. It is best to tan no more than every other day and build up tanning exposure time gradually, to give the skins' melanin, in normally unexposed areas, time to catch up with those areas always exposed outside, like the face and hands. Use a good aloe product for relief from itching. Over-dry skin caused by the light and heat from the tanning system may also cause itching. It is important to use a good moisturizing product regularly, after tanning, to prevent the skin from drying and replenish moisture loss from the tanning process. Certain chemicals or ingredients found in cosmetics, lotions, shampoos, and cleaners used on tanning beds, may also be potential causes of itching. Rashes related to indoor tanning may result from two different factors: heat build-up or an overdose of UVA. If you develop a rash, stop tanning for a few days, then resume tanning at a lower level. Most people will eventually build up immunities to these rashes. If you have a light sensitivity disorder or have taken photo sensitizers to tan faster, you could also develop a rash. The only times these can be severe is if you are phototoxic or have a sunlight-induced disease.  back to top


  10. What is that "burnt skin" smell from tanning? What causes it?
    Foremost, it is not "burnt skin". That smell is known as the "after tan odor" and it is caused by friendly bacteria on the surface of the skin. The smell is the result from the bacteria when your body/skin gets hot from a tanning bed. Designer Skin lotions contain specific antibacterial ingredients to eliminate that "after tan odor". Moreover, Maui Beach indoor tanning products contain wonderful ingredients that further mitigate the after tan odor and enhance your tanning session.  back to top


  11. Why use indoor tanning lotions?
    Skin that is fortified with an appropriate indoor tanning lotion tans quicker, darker, and more evenly. Healthy skin is the foundation of a successful tan. Indoor tanning lotions are designed to provide critical moisturizers and added benefits to your skin. The healthier your skin, the longer you keep the tan. People who avoid using tanning products will not get the necessary moisturizers, amino acids, antioxidants, and vitamins. Ultimately, they will not get as dark and eventually they will lose their tan quicker than a customer who uses indoor tanning lotions and moisturizes on a daily basis (see question # 13).  back to top


  12. Can I use an outside tanning lotion, oil, or baby oil?
    NO! The use of Outdoor Lotions, Oils, and Baby Oil is absolutely PROHIBITED! They will ruin the acrylics (the clear plastic sheets designed to protect the internal parts of the tanning equipment from dirt, fluids, and damage). Contrary to popular belief, indoor tanning lotions' sole purpose is NOT to generate additional income for tanning salons. Indoor lotions not only provide tremendous benefits for the tanner (see question # 11), they also are chemically designed, specifically, for the indoor tanning environment. Outside lotions, oils, and baby oils are made with various ingredients that prematurely destroy the acrylics. Damages will range from fogging, scratching, pitting, to premature cracking due to abrasives, harsh chemicals, and excessive heat build-up. Cost replacement of the acrylics range from $200.00 to $500.00(+).   back to top


  13. Should I use any type of moisturizer for my dry skin?
    Use moisturizers that were specifically designed and developed for indoor tanning, and use it frequently while tanning. Properly moisturized skin tans much easier and stays tan longer. It is recommended to moisturize your skin 2X's daily.  back to top


  14. What is Indoor Tanning Lotion Diversion?
    "Diversion" is when products like indoor tanning lotions are sold in "unauthorized" places. Legitimate indoor tanning products are sold exclusively in tanning salons or other businesses, offering professional indoor tanning services. You may find unauthorized indoor tanning lotions in your local supermarket, drugstore, discount websites, local flea markets, or non-tanning outlets. Indoor tanning lotions sold outside of a professional indoor tanning facility, are considered to be "diverted."  back to top


  15. Why is "Diversion" bad.
    Consumers may not be getting the indoor tanning products that they think they are when they purchase them through unauthorized outlets like discount websites, local flea markets or non-tanning outlets. Outdated, discontinued, damaged and tampered-with products are often the products that are diverted into these outlets. Diverted products may be counterfeit, contaminated, diluted, or expired formulas that may not be safe to use (see question # 14). This means, if you buy an indoor tanning lotion in a supermarket, drugstore, online, black market distributor, or any other outlet (other than an indoor tanning facility) no one can guarantee, it is an authentic product that will perform as tested. Using diverted indoor tanning lotions can be dangerous. Contaminated or counterfeit products could cause irritation, contact dermatitis, or infection. If you see an indoor tanning lotion for sale outside a salon, don't risk it, don't buy it! Remember, to insure proper use, professional tanning products should be recommended by a qualified indoor tanning specialist. Indoor tanning products have unique ingredients that should be used only as directed to ensure the finest tan possible. For more information about the proper use of indoor tanning products, just stop by any Maui Beach Tanning Salon location.  back to top


  16. Is there a "Best indoor tanning lotion"?
    The problem with that question is there is no answer. What's best for you isn't necessarily best for the next person. Everyone has their personal preferences as to what they expect a lotion to do and the results they expect to receive. Also the skin type, tanning experience, oily skin, dry skin, the type of tanning bulbs used, type of tanning bed used etc. etc.There are simply too many factors involved to determine what is the "BEST" tanning lotion.  back to top


  17. What is an Accelerator lotion?
    Accelerators are your base lotions. They are used strictly to help moisturize and boost melanin production. An Accelerator will only get your skin type as dark as it can "naturally" get. To go beyond your level, you need to use a Bronzer, Fluff, Blush, or Tingle. All lotions are accelerators, when additional ingredients and advanced formulas are added to them they become Bronzers, Fluffs, Blushes, and Tingles.  back to top


  18. What is a Bronzer lotion?
    Bronzers are added to lotions for immediate results. There are different types of bronzers that have different end-results. When a lotion has more than one type of bronzer in it, it becomes a double, triple, 10x, 50x, etc.. In essence the more bronzers - the more color you can obtain.  back to top


  19. What is a Mixture lotion?
    Mixture lotions are like they sound. They are a mix of different kinds of basic lotions to make a new kind, like Siren (a tingle and coolant combined)  back to top


  20. What is a Tingle lotion?
    Tingle, Hot, Fire, Heat .... It's all the same principal. Tingle is an ingredient that is included in some tanning lotions. Tingle lotions stimulate the epidermal layer of the skin. The stimulation brings blood closer to the surface of the skin, because the blood brings melanin with it you experience a darker tan. Tingles are a product for the experienced tanner.   back to top


  21. What is a Fluff lotion?
    Fluff lotions are added with ingredients to enhance your tanning experience, like coolants and shimmers.  back to top


  22. What is a Blush lotion?
    Blush lotions are similare to a tingle in an extremely mild way. Basically you get all the positive effects of a tingle (mildly) without the side effects of a tingle that most people dislike.  back to top


  23. How does Spray Tanning work? What is in Spray Tanning Solution?
    When applied, DHA (a sugar based derivative) reacts with proteins in the skin's superficial layer to form a golden brown color, it is not a dye, stain, or paint. Your skin begins to darken 2 to 3 hours after application and reaches its peak color within 24 hours. The color will gradually fade through natural exfoliation, just like a tan from the Sun. You'll be tan after one session, but it may take additional sessions to achieve your desired color. Once you reach your ideal color, you should be able to maintain it by spray tanning every 7 to 14 days. Dihydroxyacetone (also known as DHA) is a simple carbohydrate that is primarily used as an ingredient in sunless tanning products. It is often derived from plant sources such as sugar beets and sugar cane, by the fermentation of glycerin. DHA does not damage the skin, and is considered a safe skin coloring agent and nutritional supplement. Contact dermatitis is rarely reported. Most cases of sensitivity are due to other ingredients in the skin product preparation, such as preservatives, plant extracts, dyes or fragrances. DHA has been approved for cosmetic use by the FDA, the Canadian Health Ministry, and most of the EU member nations. DHA-based sunless tanning has been recommended by Skin Cancer Foundation, American Academy of Dermatology Association, Canadian Dermatology Association and the American Medical Association  back to top


  24. A 20 minute session in a tanning bed is equivalent to how many hours in the natural sun?
    It is difficult to make a simple comparison between the sun and modern indoor tanning equipment. Just as various kinds of indoor tanning lamps and equipment differ in spectral output and energy emitted, the sun's strength is dependant on several factors as well, such as the time of year, time of day, the latitude, cloud cover, pollution, proximity to the equator, and reflective surfaces. Consequently, there is no formula for relating indoor tanning exposure times to outdoor exposure times.  back to top


  25. Can the UV rays emitted by indoor tanning lamps pass through the skin and affect internal organs?
    The UV rays emitted by indoor tanning lamps do not emit sufficient energy to penetrate past the skin layers. Thus, despite claims and rumors to the contrary, internal organs are not directly impacted by longer wave UV light.   back to top


  26. Is it harmful to wear contact lenses when tanning indoors?
    There exists no known reason why contact lenses may not be worn while tanning indoors. When the eyes are kept closed and proper protective eyewear worn, UV light is blocked from penetrating the eye or lens. However, the heat generated by indoor tanning equipment could cause the eye to dry a bit, thereby making the lens uncomfortable. The primary reason is due to de-moisturization. Your whole body naturally loses some moisture during the tanning process, including your eyes. Just as one should moisturize the skin after tanning, contact lens wearers may also use the eyedrops recommended by his/her optometrist   back to top


  27. Why do some dermatologists warn people against sun exposure?
    The media seems to quote only certain dermatologist who advocates total avoidance of "all" sun exposure. Many dermatologists and professionals throughout the medical community have acknowledged and advocate the human body's requirement, for the positive benefits, produced by moderated UV exposure.   back to top


  28. Why do some dermatologists or medical physicians automatically blame tanning institutions for bacterial or fungus skin disorders?
    Simple, they just don't know the actual cause and it's an easy way to satisfy the patient's need for a definitive answer. Not to mention it is irresponsible and unprofessional. Why do think it's called "Practicing Medicine"? Because it is not an exact science, there are far too many variables, and unknowns to say what people contract from where. Do you ever wonder why the employees of Tanning Salons don't seem to constantly have on-going skin disorders or infections? Because, it is just not that common, any professional tanning salon that properly cleans and sanitizes would make the passing of any infectious condition, HIGHLY improbable. Also, remember to be very careful when making specific statements that can not be verified by definitive actual facts. You could fall into an open and shut law suit of "Slander". Don't be part of the population herd, get the facts for you, and remember "Knowledge is Power".  back to top


  29. Can indoor tanning cure acne?
    The FDA and the Federal Trade Commission forbid making representations regarding the benefits of indoor tanning other than its cosmetic effect. Therefore, one may not make medical claims about indoor tanning equipment. However research has shown, phototherapy (or use of UV light) has been effective in easing the skin problems common to this condition. There are also many drugs, including tetracycline and Retin-A, which are also widely used for treatment of acne. Because these drugs can render the skin photosensitive, one must avoid UV exposure when medicated. Furthermore, the use of UV light for acne treatment should only be administered by a qualified physician. The Food and Drug Administration prohibits indoor tanning equipment operators from asserting that equipment use is beneficial for any purpose other than obtaining cosmetic coloring.  back to top


  30. Can indoor tanning equipment be used to treat Psoriasis?
    The FDA and the Federal Trade Commission forbid making representations regarding the benefits of indoor tanning other than its cosmetic effect. Therefore, one may not make medical claims about indoor tanning equipment. However, phototherapy (or UV light treatment) can be used to ease the symptoms of psoriasis. The treatment is rendered by a trained physician with equipment specifically designed for such a purpose. Many salon operators report that customers who suffer from psoriasis improve after indoor tanning. Further reported, a growing number of physicians from the medical community have acknowledged and recommended moderated UV exposure in relation to treating the effects of psoriasis.  back to top


  31. Does tanning help treat Depression or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)?
    The FDA and the Federal Trade Commission forbid making representations regarding the benefits of indoor tanning other than its cosmetic effect. Therefore, one may not make medical claims about indoor tanning equipment. However, there exists a growing body of scientific evidence which indicates that some people actually require more light exposure in order to function properly. Exposure to bright light, such as that emitted by the mid-day summer sun, causes the brain to suppress the release of the hormone melatonin. Melatonin acts as a depressant in the body if generated during the daytime. Thus, when affected people are exposed to longer hours of bright light, they feel happier, euphoric and more able to enjoy life. Bright light sources emitting only visible light, are now frequently used to successfully treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and Sub-syndromal Seasonal Affective Disorder (SSAD).  back to top


  32. Can I get MRSA (staph infection) from a tanning bed?
    Yes, it is possible. However by today's standards, any professional tanning salon that properly cleans and sanitizes would make the passing of any infectious condition, HIGHLY improbable. What is Staph? Staph is the shortened name for Staphylococcus (pronounced: staf-uh-low-kah-kus), a type of bacteria. These bacteria can live harmlessly on many skin surfaces, especially around the nose, mouth, genitals, and anus. But when the skin is punctured or broken for any reason, staph bacteria can enter the wound and cause an infection. How can Maui Beach ensure that its clients won't contract Staph? Simple we clean and sanitize with "Lucasol-ONE STEP Disinfectant" from Lucas Products, Corp an EPA Registered Hospital Grade Disinfectant. Kills all disease causing germs. This hospital-grade solution promises to kill disease-causing single-cell organisms and pathogens including MRSA (staph), strep, cold, flu, mono,tinea versicolor, hepatitis-B, hepatitis-C, foot fungus, jock itch, herpes and HIV.(See question #53)  back to top


  33. Can I get Dermatophytosis or (ringworm) from a tanning bed?
    Yes, it is possible. However by today's standards, any professional tanning salon that properly cleans and sanitizes would make the passing of any infectious condition, HIGHLY improbable. What is Ringworm? Dermatophytosis or ringworm is a clinical condition caused by fungal infection of the skin in humans, pets such as cats, and domesticated animals such as sheep and cattle. The term "ringworm" is a misnomer, since the condition is caused by fungi of several different species and not by parasitic worms. The fungi that cause parasitic infection (dermatophytes) feed on keratin, the material found in the outer layer of skin, hair, and nails. These fungi thrive on skin that is warm and moist, but may also survive directly on the outsides of hair shafts or in their interiors. In pets, the fungus responsible for the disease survives in skin and on the outer surface of hairs. How can Maui Beach ensure that its clients won't contract Ringworm? Simple we clean and sanitize with "Lucasol-ONE STEP Disinfectant" from Lucas Products, Corp an EPA Registered Hospital Grade Disinfectant. Kills all disease causing germs. This hospital-grade solution promises to kill disease-causing single-cell organisms and pathogens including MRSA (staph), strep, cold, flu, mono,tinea versicolor, hepatitis-B, hepatitis-C, foot fungus, jock itch, herpes and HIV.(See question #53)  back to top


  34. Can I get Scabies (sarcoptes scabiei) from a tanning bed?
    No, direct skin-to-skin contact is the mode of transmission. Scabies is an itchy, highly contagious skin condition caused by an infestation by the itch mite Sarcoptes scabiei. Scabies produces a skin rash composed of small red bumps and blisters and affects specific areas of the body. Scabies mites are very sensitive to their environment. They can only live off of a host body for 24-36 hours under most conditions. Transmission of the mites involves close person-to-person contact of the skin-to-skin variety. It is hard, if not impossible, to catch scabies by shaking hands, hard nonporous surfaces (toilets, sinks, locker room floors, tanning beds), hanging your coat next to someone who has it, or even sharing bedclothes that had mites in them the night before. Sexual physical contact, however, can transmit the disease. In fact, sexual contact is the most common form of transmission among sexually active young people, and scabies has been considered by many to be a sexually transmitted disease (STD).   back to top


  35. Is it possible to contract aids and other sexually transmitted diseases from indoor tanning equipment?
    The passing on of some sexually transmitted diseases requires the exchange of bodily fluids from one person to another. This exchange does not take place by using indoor tanning equipment. However, this does not mean that other infectious conditions cannot be passed on by humans from unsanitary equipment and protective eyewear. Therefore, it is absolutely essential that both the acrylic and reusable protective eyewear be sanitized with the appropriate disinfectant after each use. The disinfectant Maui Beach uses is "Lucasol-ONE STEP Disinfectant" from Lucas Products, Corp an EPA Registered Hospital Grade Disinfectant. This hospital-grade solution promises to kill disease-causing single-cell organisms and pathogens including MRSA (staph), strep, cold, flu, mono,tinea versicolor, hepatitis-B, hepatitis-C, foot fungus, jock itch, herpes and HIV.(See question #53)  back to top


  36. Does tanning cause melanoma, a fatal form of skin cancer?
    Most people falsely believe that totally eliminating regular sun exposure eliminates the risk of damage from the sun. In reality, avoiding regular sun exposure still leaves you susceptible to damage when you do go outdoors, possibly even more so. Although research links skin cancer to ultraviolet light, the exact relationship is unclear, and we should avoid simplifying the issue. There are many other important studies to consider: Malignant melanoma skin cancer is most common in people who do not receive regular sun exposure and most frequently develops on parts of the body that are not regularly exposed to sunlight. Several studies suggest that many types of cancer, including breast, colon, prostate and ovarian are slowed or inhibited by increased exposure to sunlight. A 1994 study shows that northern women have five times greater risk of developing ovarian cancer than southern women who receive more direct sun exposure. In a study published in the International Journal of Cancer in 1989 (known as the Western Canada Melanoma Study), Canadian researchers found a significant inverse association between melanoma and chronic/long-term occupational sun exposure with the lowest risk in those with maximum occupational exposure. This may suggest that repeated exposure can be protective. Gradual to moderate exposure is not believed to be a strong influential factor, as melanoma generally develops on those areas not normally exposed to UV light.  back to top


  37. May pregnant women tan indoors?
    Working with your doctor on this topic is a wise choice. Every pregnancy has it's own considerations so it is always suggested you get input from your doctor when considering tanning while pregnant. There is no current scientific and/or biological reason why a pregnant woman cannot tan indoors or outdoors, so anything you hear is nothing but myths. In fact, some researchers believe the productions of vitamin D caused by exposure to UVB may be beneficial to both the mother and fetus. Because the UV light used in tanning beds does not reach the child, your baby is not at risk (see question # 25). However, there is some concern that the heat build-up which inevitably occurs when tanning indoors and outdoors may adversely affect some pregnant women, just as a sauna or jacuzzi might. A pregnant woman may not be comfortable in the tanning equipment. Your skin during pregnancy is also sensitive to burning, so you should start with short sessions until your body is tanned. The most important thing to remember is to stay cool and drink plenty of fluids. Pregnancy and tanning beds is no more harmful to your child than lying in the sun. Just use common sense and make sure you are comfortable.  back to top


  38. Can medications affect my tan?
    Certain drugs, foods, perfumes, and cosmetics may contain ingredients that could make your skin super-sensitive when exposed to ultraviolet light, whether tanning indoors or outdoors in the sun. It is usually best to remove cosmetics and perfumes before tanning. Before starting a new medication or changing a prescription, it is always best to refer to the guidelines or consult with your physician or pharmacist regarding potential effects of the medication when exposed to sunlight or tanning lamps. Some medications may contain "photosensitizing" agents that, when exposed to ultraviolet light, could cause a skin irritation or rash. Tetracycline and Retin-A, drugs widely used for the treatment of acne and some birth control pills, are a few of the medications known to have the potential to be photosensitive. While you may not necessarily experience a reaction from the medication, it is always best to be aware that a reaction could exist.  back to top


  39. Which medications are most likely to cause photosensitivity?
    Many medications and some herbal and other "natural" products have been reported to cause photosensitive reactions. In addition to topically-applied medications, cosmetics, foods and other chemicals may also produce photosensitive reactions, as may agents unintentionally applied to the skin (by handling plants, exposure to airborne allergens or wearing certain types of jewelry or leather). Some ingredients in cosmetics, perfumes, colognes, after-shaves, soaps, deodorants, lotions, shampoos, hair sprays, hair dyes, contact lens solutions and even sunscreens may also cause reactions. As mentioned earlier (see question # 34), the pharmacist is in the best position to counsel tanning consumers on both prescription and non-prescription medications, herbal and other "natural" products and perhaps even cosmetics, shampoos and similar purchases that may make people sensitive to ultraviolet light.  back to top


  40. Why does Maui Beach always verify I am using protective eyewear?
    Indoor tanning salon owners and operators are obligated to verify every client using tanning equipment is using federally compliant eyewear. It is our goal to educate customers about the fact that towels, scarves or eyelids do not adequately protect eyes from ultraviolet exposure. In addition to possible state laws, Federal regulations (CFR 21 1040.20 (c)(4) require that tanners wear protective eyewear that block 99.9% of the UVB light and 99% of UVA. It is our responsibility that all tanning clients use federally compliant eyewear. Acceptable eyewear must state the product's compliance with federal regulations on the package  back to top


  41. What would happen if I didn't use eyewear?
    When proper eyewear is not used during the tanning process, the potential for eye injury is greatly increased. Some eye injuries and disorders include Photokeratitis (Cornea Sunburn), Cataracts, Pterygium (Abnormal tissue growth) and Damage To The Cornea.   back to top


  42. How do I prevent "raccoon eyes?"
    Raccoon eyes occur for the same reason that some people who don't adjust the watch on their arm get raccoon wrist. Adjusting the protective eyewear occasionally during a tanning session will help to minimize this condition. The adjustment can be performed by gently sliding the eyewear to a new position. You should never lift the eyewear off of your eyes to adjust their position.  back to top


  43. Should I shower before my tanning session?
    A shower is not recommended 1 hour before tanning but you should remove any makeup or perfume before your tanning session. Some ingredients in makeup and perfume can make skin more sensitive to UV light and lead to overexposure or sunburn  back to top


  44. Should I shower after a tanning session?
    The tanning process will actually continue for a period of time after a tanning session. Taking a shower will remove the mantel acid from your skin and slow down or stop this continued tanning process. It is recommended you not shower for 2 hours after your tanning session or 1 hour before.  back to top


  45. My face and legs are real hard to get tan. What should I do about that?
    Your face is the only part of our body that does not produce it's own moisture. Our legs become a little dryer because of clothing, hosiery etc. The fact is that moist skin tans much better than dry skin. Try using a moisturizer at least twice a day while tanning, especially on the face and legs.  back to top


  46. I keep tanning but I just can't seem to get any darker. What can I do?
    The skin will actually become thicker as your tanning progresses and makes it difficult for the tanning UV light to penetrate the epidermis (upper layers of skin). This is commonly referred to as a tanning "Plateau". Moisturizer is extremely important to your tanning at this point. Your skin cells are standing up as much as 45 and are actually reflecting the UV rays. Using a lot of moisturizing lotion will help these cells lay down and become more translucent, therefore more receptive to UV rays. The recommendation is to use a good step 1 lotion (step 1 lotions have a lot of moisturizer) for 2 or 3 tans to get your skin softened up then start a rotation with a step 2 or 3 lotion. Rotate your tans, two tans with the step 1 lotion. Then one tan with the step 2 or 3 lotion. Keep this rotation up and use plenty of moisturizer, you will get over your Plateau  back to top


  47. I can't get tan outdoors, will tanning in a tanning bed help?
    Probably not. Some skin types tan quickly and easily, while others just don't have the pigmentation necessary to develop a tan. Approximately 5% of the population is unable to tan at all.  back to top


  48. I'm over 40, and I don't seem to tan as good as I used to. Why is that?
    The reason is that after 40 your body begins to lose melanocytes. Not to worry though. Through controlled, systematic exposures you can slowly replenish what your body began to lose.  back to top


  49. What are some precautions with tanning?
    Don't try to rush your tan, NEVER burn. A tan should be obtained gradually. Gradually increase your exposure times. Consult your physician if you are taking any medication. Some medication can cause extra sensitivity to the UV light, causing overexposure. Also consult your physician if you have any type of skin irritation or other condition. Always wear protective eyewear. Ultraviolet light will penetrate the eyelids.  back to top


  50. I heard Tanning Beds have been reclassified by the FDA, what does that mean for me?
    The Indoor Tanning Association, a trade group that represents sunlamp manufacturers, submitted comments to the FDA after the rule was first proposed a year ago, stating that "sunlamp products are not medical devices but instead are electronic products" and that reclassifying them into a higher risk category is "contrary to law" and "exceeds the agency's statutory authority." The group has not yet decided whether to file a lawsuit against the FDA to try to thwart the new regulation, executive director John Overstreet said in an interview. "We've always maintained that the science isn't there on the risks of sunlamps," Overstreet said. "We're disappointed that [the FDA] decided to go this route." For Example; The US Food and Drug Administration announced on Thursday that it will now require sunlamps used in tanning salons to carry a black-box warning stating that the product should not be used by children under the age of 18, by August 26, 2015. Materials used to market the UV lamps and tanning beds -- like websites, brochures, or user instructions -- must now include regular tanning bed users "should be regularly evaluated for skin cancer" due to repeated exposure UV radiation and that the use of UV lamps can be particularly dangerous for those with a family history of skin cancer. The agency reclassified the devices as "moderate-risk" from "low-risk" and now requires manufacturers to demonstrate that their products meet certain performance testing requirements and have certain elements in their product design in order to receive FDA clearance to put them in tanning salons or to sell them directly to consumers. As stated in FDA's proposed order to reclassify these devices, there is no evidence that moderate non-burning UV exposure or attaining a "base tan" provides any protection against premature aging of the skin or reduces the risk of skin cancer. The Agency concurs with the comment that there are other risk factors for melanoma besides sunbed use. Dr. David G. Hoel, 1 of the 20 scientists that were called upon by the IARC in 2009 to reassess the carcinogenicity of all forms of radiation, has written a report stating that the 2006 IARC conclusion that there is a 75 percent increase in melanoma risk when tanning starts before age 35 is invalid. Dr. Hoel is preparing an article for publication on the subjects of melanoma, UV radiation, and the IARC report. The purpose of this article is to correct the many misconceptions about the science regarding UV radiation and melanoma that have been promoted by the AAD and other anti-tanning advocates. Dr. Hoel argues that the significant differences between regulatory standards in the United States and Europe with regard to use of sunlamp products make the predominantly European data in the IARC report an inappropriate basis for the FDA's decision to change the controls applicable to sunlamp products in the United States. In conclusion, the FDA has implemented more regulations, unfortunately for everyone involved, it appears the data continues to be inconclusive and compiled with nonfactual data, just like the proposed dangerous effects of the consumption of "Milk" or "Eggs".  back to top


  51. My friend says that a sunburn will fade into a tan.
    This is NOT true! Many people FALSELY assume that a sunburn will eventually "fade" into a tan. Sunburn is associated with permanent skin damage !! Sunburn is an injury to your skin. That's why it hurts so bad! Never! Never! burn yourself intentionally. If you get sunburns, what you are really getting is cellular damage from ultraviolet radiation. The body responds to sunburn damage by increasing the blood flow to the capillary bed of the dermis in order to bring in new cells to repair the damage. The extra blood in the capillaries causes the redness - if you press on sunburned skin it will turn white and then return to red as the capillaries refill. The Golden Rule of responsible tanning is: Don't ever sunburn.   back to top


  52. If a tan and a sunburn are different, just what is a sunburn?
    Sunburns occur when the skin is exposed to excessive amounts of UV light. The severity can vary from mild pink with only minor discomfort to severe "lobster-red" burns that blister. Sunburn results when the amount of exposure to the sun or other ultraviolet light source exceeds the ability of the body's protective pigment, melanin, to protect the skin. A serious sunburn is as serious as a thermal burn, and may have the same systemic effects such as blistering, edema, and fever. A sunburn is better prevented than treated.  back to top


  53. Should people tan who have skin cancer in the past?
    No! They shouldn't tan indoors or outdoors even though their cancer may be gone. The skin cancers that people are experiencing today are due, in large part, to overexposure to ultraviolet rays 15-30 years prior (SUNBURNING) and should be regularly evaluated due to repeated exposure to UV radiation. Also, the use of UV can be particularly dangerous for Type I individuals or those with a family history of skin cancer. However a wonderful alternative, for any individual who does not or cannot tan through conventional means, is UV Free/Spray Tanning. Just stop by any Maui Beach Tanning Salon location and one of our Certified Spray Tan Technicians will be happy to assist you. (See question # 23).   back to top


  54. How does Maui Beach ensure the quality of their bed cleaning/sanitizing process?
    Maui Beach Tanning Salon disinfects our equipment, tanning furniture, and protective eyewear, after every use, before we open, and after we close, with a hospital grade disinfectant, "Lucasol", EPA Registered Hospital Grade Disinfectant. Kills all disease causing germs. This product contains the following: A Hospital Grade Deodorizer, Disinfectant, Detergent, Viurcide, Fungicide, and Mildwestat. Strong, yet safe for sanitizing and disinfecting any hard non-porous surfaces. Kills 99.999% of bacteria / pathogens in 60 seconds.  back to top


  55. What can I expect from red light therapy treatments?
    Treatments using red light will improve skin tone and texture, control pigmentation spots, help reduce pore size, encourage vibrant, healthier-looking skin,and reduce wrinkles. Anti-aging red light therapy stimulates circulation and repairs the elastin fibers within tissue to help keep skin firm.  back to top


  56. Are red light treatments safe? What does the FDA say?
    According to the FDA, red light at 633nm has a "non-significant risk" status and is completely safe for the eyes. Red light penetrates tissue to a depth of 8 - 10 mm, delivering energy to stimulate a response from the body to heal itself.  back to top


  57. How does Rejuvenessence red light therapy work?
    Red light at 633nm is absorbed by the mitochondria of the cell and stimulates intracellular energy transfer (ATP) production for enhanced cell vitality and permeability, increased production of new collagen, and increased turnover of collagen and elastin fibers. Laboratory studies have shown that skin cells grow 150 - 200 percent faster when exposed to certain light wavelengths, and research has shown red light delivers powerful therapeutic benefits to living tissue.  back to top


  58. Does red light therapy produce the same light as from the sun?
    Rejuvenessence "Collagen Plus" lamps utilize the visible spectra of light at 633nm (red), but contain no UVA or UVB rays.  back to top


  59. How does red light therapy differ from laser treatments?
    Red light therapy does not cut, burn, or break the skin as with laser treatments. Lasers use heat and concentrated light to vaporize or remove tissue. Rejuvenessence "Collagen Plus" lamps produce no vaporization or burning of tissue, and therefore no inflammation or erythema. Red light therapy is one of the few non-invasive tools available that can reverse the appearance of aging skin, such as wrinkles and mottled skin tone.  back to top


  60. How soon will red light therapy results become noticeable?
    There are few immediate changes to skin, as change occurs naturally over a period of weeks. Everyone reacts differently, depending on their age and the condition of their skin. In general, best results are achieved over an 8 - 12 week period.  back to top


  61. Does Rejuvenessence red light therapy lamps treat acne, age spots, and weathered skin?
    Red light helps remove the bacteria that causes acne, and generates cellular activity that deals with age spots and weather damaged skin. Anti-aging red light therapy brightens skin and reduces the formation of pigmentation marks.  back to top


  62. Does red light treat cellulite?
    No, there are no studies suggesting that cellulite is treatable with red light therapy.  back to top


  63. Does red light therapy work equally well on all skin types?
    Rejuvenessence "Collagen Plus" therapy is safe and effective for all skin types and colors. The main prerequisite is that skin be clean for effective light transmission.  back to top


  64. How long will red light therapy results last?
    Results depend on the length of treatment and the original conditions being treated. Skin rejuvenation is a dynamic process. If maintenance treatments are discontinued, natural expression lines will gradually return over the course of time, at which point re-treatment can be put in place.  back to top


  65. Will red light therapy treatments hurt?
    No. Unlike lasers or other ablative (skin harming) treatments, red light therapy treatments are non-thermal, non-ablative, and non-invasive. Clients report no discomfort or pain associated with red light therapy treatments.  back to top


  66. Can red light therapy hurt my eyes?
    No studies have been found showing any harmful effects to the eyes. However, we recommend not staring directly into the red light lamps. Although, protective eyewear is recommended, it is not required during a red light therapy session.  back to top